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data:esslli2008:start [2008/06/18 00:00]
127.0.0.1 external edit
data:esslli2008:start [2010/11/01 14:07] (current)
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-====== ​Data sets for the evaluation of word space models ​======+====== ​Shared Tasks from the ESSLLI 2008 Workshop ​======
  
-This page contains a developing list of tasks, sub-tasks and corresponding (sub-)data-sets. +===== Task 1: Free Association ​=====
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-Other tasks or sub-tasks might be added in the near future. +
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-===== Ordered by task categories ===== +
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-==== Task 1: Free Association ====+
  
 It is tempting to make a connection between the **statistical association** patterns of words -- both first-order associations (//​collocations//​) and higher-order associations (//word space//) -- and **human free associations** -- the first words that come to mind when native speakers are presented with a stimulus word.  In this  task, we will explore to what extent such free associations can be explained and predicted by statistically salient patterns in the linguistic experience of speakers, possibly offering a simple and straightforward cognitive interpretation of distributional similarity (i.e. higher-order association). ​ However, this is not merely a "​baseline"​ task: it also touches on intriguing research problems such as the interaction of first-order and higher-order information in human associative memory. It is tempting to make a connection between the **statistical association** patterns of words -- both first-order associations (//​collocations//​) and higher-order associations (//word space//) -- and **human free associations** -- the first words that come to mind when native speakers are presented with a stimulus word.  In this  task, we will explore to what extent such free associations can be explained and predicted by statistically salient patterns in the linguistic experience of speakers, possibly offering a simple and straightforward cognitive interpretation of distributional similarity (i.e. higher-order association). ​ However, this is not merely a "​baseline"​ task: it also touches on intriguing research problems such as the interaction of first-order and higher-order information in human associative memory.
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-==== Task 2: Categorization ====+===== Task 2: Categorization ​=====
  
 Categorization tasks play a prominent role in cognitive research on concepts. In this type of tasks, subjects Categorization tasks play a prominent role in cognitive research on concepts. In this type of tasks, subjects
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- +===== Task 3: Property Generation ​=====
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-==== Task 3: Property Generation ====+
  
 The ability to describe a concept in terms of its salient properties is an important feature of human conceptual cognition. In this task, we compare human-generated //norms// collected by psychologists to the properties generated by computational models. The ability to describe a concept in terms of its salient properties is an important feature of human conceptual cognition. In this task, we compare human-generated //norms// collected by psychologists to the properties generated by computational models.